The Miracle of Moringa

What in the world is Moringa?moringa

In the U.S. most people have not heard of this plant, but it has been well known around the world as a miracle tree.

The Moringa tree is native to Africa and Asia and is sometimes called the ‘drumstick tree’ in the Philippines.  In India, it is found in the foothills of the Himalayas.

The most commonly used parts are the leaves and seed, but the pods, fruit, flowers, roots and bark all have uses and are a powerhouse of nutrients and antioxidants.  The entire tree is useful or edible in some manner.  Many traditional medicines are made from the parts in the countries it is native to  and it is claimed to have the capacity to cure several diseases.

Moringa is safe for consumption, although there are some precautions concerning the roots, bark and flowers in certain specific situations. particularly pregnancy (see webMD link below). But in normal circumstances, the leaves, tender stems and ‘drums’ are completely safe for everyone and highly nutritious.

Moringa leaves contain about 30 antioxidants, which work in the body to combat the free-radicals that cause disease.

moringa seedThe moringa seed contain 40% edible oil known as Ben oil. It is a clear, sweet and odorless oil that is rich in antioxidants, protects against heavy-metal toxicity and is similar to olive oil in terms of its nutritional profile. It has an indefinite shelf life as it does not turn rancid like other oils. The oil is also used for cosmetic purposes

 

Moringa contains all the essential amino acids needed by the body.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins which are needed to grow, repair and maintain cells. Human body manufactures 10 to 12 amino acids. The remaining 8 amino acids are known as the essential amino acids which should be provided from everyday diet and moringa contains all of them. The list of essential amino acids and their benefits are listed below.

ISOLEUCINE Helps in building protein and enzymes and creation of biochemical components within the body.
LEUCINE Builds protein and enzymes along with isoleucine to enhance body’s energy and alertness.
LYSINE Ensures the absorption of right amount of calcium by the body and aids in collagen formation and production of antibodies, hormones and enzymes. Maintains the balance of nutrients that reduce viral growth.
METHEONINE Provides sulphur to the body and prevents hair, skin and nail problems. Lowers cholesterol levels by increasing liver’s production of lecithin. Helps in reducing liver fat and bladder irritation.
PHENYLALAINE Production of chemicals required to transmit signals between nerve cells and brain, thus reducing hunger pains. It also improves memory.
THREONINE Forms an important part of collagen, elastin and enamel proteins. Assists metabolism, prevents fat build up in the liver and boosts digestive and intestinal tracts.
TRYTOHYAN Supports the immune system and alleviates insomnia. Reduction of anxiety, depression and migraine symptoms. Decreases the risk of artery and heart spasms as it reduces cholesterol levels along with lysine.
VALINE Promotes a sharp mind, coordinated muscles and calm mood

Moringa has been used:

  • moringa trim to boost energy levels by stimulating metabolism and cell structures of the body – because of this it aids in weight loss, a definite plus.
  • to heal ulcers
  • to stop tumor growth
  • to reduce arthritis pain and inflammation
  • to control blood pressure
  • to stimulate the immune system and it is often prescribed for AIDS afflicted patients.
  • to prevent blindness as it is rich in vitamin A or beta-carotene
  • to dramatically increase production of breast milk. (leaves and tea only!)
  • to balance sugar levels, it can be extremely effective against diabetes
  • in balancing the cholesterol levels
  • to help calm the nerves. The leaves are said to have anti-depressant properties.
  • to replace vitamin and mineral supplements as it is a natural source of calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, selenium, copper, zinc and manganese and vitamins A, B’s, C, D, E,  and more.
  • as a method of birth control in certain medical preparations (always be extremely cautious of anything you put into your body when pregnant!)
  • as an aphrodisiac: Like every ‘miracle’ food, there are claims that moringa boosts your libido and stamina, and frankly, with all the good nutrition, it would be no surprise if this area did improve!

Moringa leaves also contain sulfur. This mineral is present in every single cell of the body and is the key ingredient for Collagen and keratin, which are building blocks for healthy skin and nails. Perhaps this is part of the reason for the claims of better skin and wrinkle reduction in those who regularly consume moringa.

Last but not least, Moringa has antibacterial properties and can be used as a purifier and as a natural detoxifier. In areas where the water is impure moringa seeds are used to absorb the impurities. In a similar manner, moringa works in the body to remove toxins from the blood.

Moringa is a food substance and is used as such in many countries, not a medicine that has side effects.  It is one of the healthiest food products on the planet.  It’s time we learned more about it, and started making it a regular part of our own diets.

The great thing is, it is easy to grow!  I live in Florida, and I have 4 trees in my yard.  They grow like weeds!  In a year they grew from 2 to 10 feet tall, and that was with me trimming them regularly to use for eating and to dry the leaves.  I know people who are growing them indoors, they just have to be trimmed regularly or they will be hitting the ceiling!

Moringa Trees

Two of My Moringa Trees in My Back Yard

Scroll below the Resources for some recipes and ideas for use.

Some Excellent Resources for more information:

The Incredible Health Benefits of Moringa Leaves:

moringa2

The Health Benefits of Moringa: A Modern Miracle Tree

Moringa-1400x500

 

 

 

 

Moringa: One Of The World’s Most Abundant Sources of Vitamins And Minerals

Moringa Tree Via: Stephen Orsillo

What the Medical Community says about Moringa at WebMD –  Including benefits and some cautions during pregnancy.

 

Moringa Nutrient Charts (.pdf)

 

Moringa Documentary from the Discovery Channel  — Excellent!

 

HOW TO USE MORINGA

My favorite way is simply as a dried leaf. I trim the plants, strip the leaves and tender stems from the branches and spread them on a clean sheet on the bed in c-drying moringaour guest room. There they fan dry in the dark for 3-4 days, getting stirred every 12 or so hours.

Then I use the powder in EVERYTHING!  From smoothies to sprinkling it into skillet dishes (near the end to keep as many nutrients in it as possible), to adding it to baked goods and even a little in oatmeal.  A little in a lot of things adds up to a lot of extra nutrition packed into your food.

Dried and Crushed

Crushed after Drying

You can steep it into a tea also.  I use about a teaspoon of the loose leaves, and steep them for 3-5 minutes. Moringa tea has a unique flavor and if you don’t particularly care for it, add it to your favorite herb tea and get the benefits while not catching the flavor straight up.  Some people love it, some don’t. But either way, you can find a way to use it. Many people like it with a bit of peppermint or lemon.

 

If you are not lucky enough to be able to grow your own, you can get dried Moringa from many sources.  However, I like to support organizations that support others so I would suggest purchasing from ECHO, which is an organization that not only sells the trees, but works to plant them in areas where hunger and malnutrition is prevalent.  All proceeds from the sale of books, plants, gifts and seeds are used to support the global ministry of ECHO. Your purchase will make a valuable contribution to fighting world hunger. Partnering with ECHO by purchasing from them helps to sow “seeds of hope” around the world!

ECHO – Purchase Moringa products here!

ECHO has other awesome products also.  The link above takes you directly to the Moringa page, but please look around before you leave.

Moringa PestoMy other favorite way is fresh, tossed into salads, or made into Pesto. (see my 100+ Ways to Make Pesto article for ideas and ‘How-To’). Moringa Pesto is deep and earthy and so healthy for you.

It’s great on pasta, spread on gluten free crackers or veggies, or right off the spoon!  I’ve smothered chicken breasts in it and baked them, made pesto shrimp and topped grass-fed steak with it.

 

It looked so good the last time I made it, I thought it deserved a fancy glass!

The moringa pesto works especially well with a sweeter nut like almonds, cashews or pistachios which play against the slightly bitter taste of the moringa nicely.

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I found this link and while I am not endorsing their products because I do not know them, the recipe page here is extensive!

1001 ways to eat and cook Moringa

Moringa Tree of Life.com    also has some good recipes and some more information about Moringa (good smoothie recipe here also)

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Once my own trees get bigger, I am hoping to be able to provide dried moringa at a reasonable price.
If you are interested, please leave a comment below so I know if there is any interest.

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6 Comments

  1. Thank you for your kind words. I am so sorry for the delay in getting back to you – life has pulled me in a lot of directions lately and I have neglected the Reboot for a week or so!

    What can I do for you? I’m here to be of service and to help people navigate the health maze that exists these days. Email me at janinerose@edenreboot.com if you would like to talk further. I’d love to hear from you!

    Janine

  2. You are so cool! I do not think I have read anything
    like that before. So wonderful to find somebody with some genuine thoughts
    on this issue. Really.. many thanks for starting this up.

    This site is one thing that’s needed on the web, someone with a
    bit of originality!

  3. Hadley, I am so glad you will be enjoying it, and thank you for your kind words. I apologize for the delay in getting back to you, it was a busy weekend out in the garden and community! I hope more people are encouraged to try moringa, because it really has fabulous health benefits.

  4. Thank you for the wonderful Moringa! I look forward to feeding it to my body. What a great article . Great information. looking forward to reading more.

  5. Moringa is not a picky plant – it is grown in areas where there is poor soil and terrible growing conditions, which is why it is now being used in many impoverished areas around the world where famine is an issue. They do like FULL SUN and they love our Florida sandy soil. I would suggest a spot where the water doesn’t tend to pool after the rain. I notice that my lower branches will yellow after that happens, so a welll drained area would be best, but other than that, they grow like weeds once they take off. Remember, they are cute now, but they grow into TREES!!! So plan accordingly.

    Keep them in pots until they are about 3-4 feet high, and begin trimming lightly at that point to encourage branching. The more branches you have lower down the less reaching you will need to do later to harvest (speaking from experience!!) My two newest are being trimmed much more carefully with this in mind than my first two were.

    Miss you too… can’t wait till you have enough to harvest to try the pesto. It’s more bitter than some, you might try adding just a hint of mint or use some pecans in the mix for a little sweetness to offset it. Until then, you can just eat your leaves on sandwiches or in salads. The stems are edible too if you want to grind them up… although I generally just compost them… making for some very healthy compost. 🙂

  6. Over the weekend I was gifted two moringa pups! I don’t want anything to happen to them…. where is best to plant them?

    By the way… I miss you. 🙂

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